Wildlife Management Area Closures

OTNJ is disappointed to hear about the recent actions by the DEP regarding closures within certain Wildlife Management Areas. OTNJ as well as other stakeholder groups have been in recent contact with the DEP, and in those discussions, they stressed they were planning to be open and transparent and to engage the public in their future plans regarding access. We have no doubt that these WMAs are experiencing stress from illegal activity, however, closures are the worst possible outcome from the perspective of a law abiding citizen. Unless enforcement is stepped up, all this will accomplish is preventing law abiding citizens from gaining access while the offenders will continue unabated. These types of actions make us wonder if the DEP is really planning on engaging the stakeholders and if they learned from previous mistakes in this area. If this action is impacting you, please contact NJ Fish and Wildlife at 609-292-2965 or email them by clicking here: https://www.njfishandwildlife.com/contactform.htm

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Press Release from DEP

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE         
December 11, 2017
 
 
Contact: Lawrence Hajna      (609) 984-1795
                Robert Geist            (609) 292-2994
                Caryn Shinske          (609) 984-1795
 
 
DEP SEEKS PUBLIC COMMENT ON MAJOR UPDATE TO STATE WILDLIFE ACTION PLAN
PLAN WILL GUIDE WILDLIFE CONSERVATION STRATEGIES OVER NEXT DECADE
 
(17/P119) TRENTON – The Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Fish and Wildlife is seeking public comment on a major revision of the State Wildlife Action Plan, a blueprint that will guide wildlife conservation decisions and efforts in New Jersey over the next decade.
 
The State Wildlife Action Plan will provide a strategic vision for conservation actions for wildlife species of concern and is used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of its process in determining eligibility for important grant funding to states. This is the first revision of New Jersey’s plan since 2006. 
 
“The State Wildlife Action Plan will guide DEP’s work and that of New Jersey’s very active conservation community in protecting our most vulnerable wildlife, ensuring that our great diversity of species can be enjoyed by future generations,” said DEP Commissioner Bob Martin. “We look forward to gathering valuable input from the public and conservation organizations across the state as we work together to develop the best plan possible.”
 
State Wildlife Action Plans assess the health of each state’s wildlife species and their habitats, identify the problems they face, and outline the actions needed to conserve them over the long term.  New Jersey’s 2005 Plan has helped sustain and enhance populations of at-risk species. The updated plan will continue to provide a guide for actions to protect species of greatest conservation need.
 
“By focusing on the needs of species of concern, this plan will help the Division of Fish and Wildlife make important conservation decisions that can prevent species from becoming listed as threatened or endangered,” said Division of Fish and Wildlife Director Larry Herrighty.
 
The public is encouraged to submit comments online. To view or download the draft State Wildlife Action Plan and submit comments, visit: www.nj.gov/dep/fgw/ensp/waphome.htm
 
Previously known as the Comprehensive Wildlife Conservation Strategy, the State Wildlife Action Plan is a 10-year blueprint for protecting rare and declining wildlife species. To make the plan more focused and to establish clear and reasonable implementation goals, the proposed revision identifies 107 Focal Species from a list of 656 Species of Greatest Conservation Need (SGCN) that will be the target of conservation actions, such as habitat identification and management as well as research efforts.
 
The list includes bird species such as American woodcock, northern harrier, piping plover, cerulean warbler, and peregrine falcon; fish species such as brook trout, shortnose sturgeon, Atlantic sturgeon, and ironcolor shiner; reptile and amphibian species such as the northern scarlet snake,  bog turtle, New Jersey chorus frog, and northern diamondback terrapin; mammals such as the little brown bat, Indiana bat, and Allegheny woodrat; and invertebrates such as yellow lamp mussel, American bumble bee, and pink sallow moth.
 
Conservation actions have been developed to address the most serious threats to these species, such as habitat loss, pollution, invasive species, and emerging diseases. Recommended actions include habitat protection and restoration, management of SGCN populations, and targeted monitoring to measure results.
 
In lieu of online submissions, written comments may be mailed to:
 
Wildlife Action Plan Comments
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection
Division of Fish and Wildlife
PO Box 420, MC 501-03
Trenton, NJ  08625-0420
 
The DEP will consider all comments before submitting the final plan to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.  The public review and comment period will remain open until Jan. 19, 2018.

Important – TAKE ACTION TODAY

Please see our page regarding the resolution being taken up by the Pinelands Commission this Friday, July 14th.  The meeting starts at 9:30 am at the Richard J. Sullivan Center for Environmental Policy and Education, Terrence D. Moore Conference Room, 15C Springfield Road, New Lisbon, New Jersey

OTNJ’s position on this resolution can be found at this link
This is a specific call to action with some suggested text and a link to send an email to the Commissioners on this page.

Other important links to important information:

Open Trails NJ Participates in DEP Protection Project

Open Trails NJ staff participated with other groups in a small volunteer activity to protect four sensitive intermittent ponds in Wharton State Forest. This activity furthers the protection of sensitive areas without requiring mass road closures. We are thankful to the DEP for continuing to forge relationships with the stakeholder groups in their mission to protect the forest and look forward to participating in future protection projects!

Read the DEP Press Release for details.

 

 

Wharton State Forest Hunter Vehicle Access Program

The DEP has announced that they will be allowing vehicle access to two of the Enivronmentally Sensitive Areas (ESA) during hunting season this year. A pass can be picked up at Atsion or Batsto offices. The passes are valid from 9/24/16 – 01/01/17. The specific ESAs that will be accessible have not been identified, but we will seek clarification on which will accessible and update you.

Full detail provided by the DEP is as follows:

2016 WHARTON STATE FOREST HUNTER VEHICLE ACCESS PROGRAM

In 2016, the Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) designated areas on Wharton State Forest to be environmentally sensitive areas (ESA’s) for plants or wildlife. As a result, the State Park Service installed signage to advise motorists accordingly as to the locations of these ESAs and State Park Police have vigorously enforced off-road offenders.

The DEP is providing limited, off season vehicle access to licensed hunters into two specific areas. No cost vehicle access passes shall be issued as part of in-person registration at Wharton State Forest’s Atsion or Batsto park offices during normal business hours. One pass shall be issued to each hunter holding a valid automobile driver’s license. The pass must be carried in the vehicle while driven within the two specific ESA’s and left in plain view in the windshield whenever parked with the hunter afield. Additionally, the vehicle access passes are non-transferable.

State Park Police may issue summonses to any driver operating within the two specific EASs who fails to possess the hunter vehicle access pass. Additionally, motorists may NOT operate vehicles off the roadway. No entering fields, bogs, swamps or adjacent woodlands.

Passes will be available at 9:00 A.M. on Saturday, September 24, 2016, and will expire on January 31, 2017 coinciding with the duration of the Winter Bow Season. The program will be evaluated throughout the fall and early winter for next year. Hunters must abide by established seasons and regulations while afield.

Questions regarding the program should be directed to the Wharton State Forest Superintendent at 609.561.0074

Erosion Prevention at Jemima Mount

Now that the heat of summer is breaking, we plan to get back out to IMG_2322Jemima Mount to complete the project we started there. We will finish filling the trenches with deadfall to prevent further erosion. We will also be extending one of the railings to prevent go arounds. The first part of the project that we completed in the spring has been a great success so far, proving that we can create solutions to problems without mass road closures. Let’s keep up the good work! Please join us!

Event Details:

You can meet us at Atsion Ranger Station and 9:00 AM 10/2. If your vehicle is not able to make the trip, we can carpool. Alternatively, you can meet directly at Jemima around 9:30AM. Any questions, please post in the comments.

-We will be dragging nearby deadfall into the trenches so it is recommended you wear a good pair of work gloves.
-Wear long long pants and bring plenty of bug spray to prevent chiggers and ticks
-This is a family friendly event but all minors must be accompanied by an adult
-If you are attending, please RSVP to this event so we can get a rough headcount.

Protecting Jemima Mount- An OTNJ Sponsored Volunteer Project

One of the lightning rod issues in the battle over the MAP was the damage that has been done at Jemima Mount. It was used an example and pictured in nearly every newspaper article about the MAP. Ironically, Jemima Mount had already been closIMG_2322ed to motor vehicles for well over a decade. However, no other actions were taken and damage continued unabaited. Open Trails NJ was founded on the premise of creating practical solutions that will actually SOLVE these issues. Open Trails has proposed a protection project to the DEP and this project was accepted. We will once and for all protect Jemima and remove it as a talking point for those who want to eliminate recreational access in the forest. To accomplish this goal we will be sponsoring a volunteer event on June 5th. We will only be able to accept a limited number of volunteers for this activity so we will take volunteers on a first come, first serve basis. If you are interested in attending, please email us at info@opentrailsnj.org Additional information will be forthcoming.

Update on Road Closures in Wharton State Forest

John Druding of Open Trails had a conference call with the Director of Parks and Forestry, Mr. Mark Texel, regarding the DEP’s plans for Wharton State Forest.  Mr. Texel shared that the DEP has identified several “Environmentally Sensitive Areas” or ESAs, in which motorized vehicles are not allowed. The ESAs are mostly bogs, but do include a very small number of roads, specifically, East Stokes Rd and Hampton Gate/High Crossing Rd.  All the ESAs have been posted and Mr. Texel has confirmed that there are no additional closures planned.  That being said, that doesn’t mean that there will never be another closure, however, Mr. Texel confirmed that any new closures will involve the stakeholders.
The primary purpose of the posting of ESAs is to facilitate enforcement by allowing charges to be able to be upheld in court, a previous serious impediment to enforcement.
Regarding the closure of Stokes and Hampton Gate/High Crossing, the DEP is aware that these are major roads with a long history, however, they are currently in disrepair.   As a result of their status as historical through ways,  they will be considered for repair in the 2016 maintenance budget.
Overall, the impact to motorized access is extremely small, only a fraction of what would have been lost with the original MAP plan. Open Trails supports the plan that the DEP has laid out as it is good compromise between access and protection of the forest’s resources.   

Solving the Problems Facing our Forests while Maintaining Access for Responsible Recreation